Technology Infrastructure with a Future

Keeping pace with technology is the challenge of our times, but having the capacity to do so shouldn’t be. What’s required, according to Loring’s Technology Services Vice President David Stumer, is a flexible approach to infrastructure design that supports the widest range of technologies and anticipates next-generation audio/visual, data and security needs.

Technology Services continues to be a growth area for Loring Consulting Engineers, Inc., with a portfolio of projects comprising of banks, trading floors, municipal buildings, police precincts, hospitals, universities, IT firms, corporate headquarters and more. “Our overall strategy is to keep pathways and spaces application-independent for continuously increasing bandwidth needs,” says Stumer. “Of course, the client’s goals are paramount and will vary by type of facility, market sector and intended length of stay. An example would be short-term lease versus ownership.”

Connecting our Clients
Loring’s expertise in technology services is reflected in its “A” list of clients, many of whom are repeat customers. In coordination with Loring’s MEP design team, the firm has provided engineering services to meet the technology needs of longtime client IBM for its offices in New York, North Carolina and Pennsylvania, as well as to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York to expand its telecom infrastructure and to the 2016 ENR New York regional project winner Ramapo College Adler Center.

For Bank of New York Mellon, Loring has provided telecommunications engineering services for more than 1 million sf of national design award-winning space in Pittsburgh, New York, Princeton, Philadelphia and Toronto. Other significant projects include a national contract to design technology solutions for the Regus Group, the world’s largest provider of flexible workspaces; and telecom, AV, telepresence capabilities and state-of-the-art security services for Israeli-based software company NICE Systems in Hoboken, NJ and Richardson, TX. Loring is also providing full technology services including telecommunications, AV and security for the conversion of 300,000 sf of office space to 27 courtrooms and ancillary spaces for the New York State Office of Courts Administration, and for the $220 million renovation of the Wyoming State Capitol.

Wired, Wireless and the Cloud
The demand now is all about wireless—which still requires wire and infrastructure. In some cases, the Cloud is eclipsing traditional servers for storage to free up real estate and reduce infrastructure space requirements. “Cloud-based storage, however, is not always the optimal solution,” notes Stumer. “Requirements for a mission critical facility, where loss of connectivity —even momentarily—is untenable, are different from those in an office environment.” Balance, one of Loring’s guiding principles in engineering service delivery, is key in technology infrastructure as well.